Sue Venn 15 posts
Making connections, experiencing flow, and countering consumption: crafting is more fun with less stuff | Blog by Sue Venn
One of the research projects within CUSP is concerned with how wellbeing can be enhanced through immersing oneself in challenging activities, leading to a state of ‘flow’. BBC Four's recent MAKE! Craft Britain programme is a perfect showcase of that concept. The programme is connecting people to traditional crafts, past and present generations — and, importantly, to those with whom we are crafting.
Prosperity Is…? | A Research Log by S Venn, K Burningham, K Skippon and T Jackson
What can prosperity possibly mean in a world of environmental and social limits? This question lies at the heart of CUSP’s five year research programme on sustainable prosperity. We wanted to know how ordinary people in different contexts might answer this question, so we set out to ask them. What we found was fascinating.
Sustainable Consumption in Early Motherhood | Journal Paper by Kate Burningham and Sue Venn
In their new paper for the Journal of Consumer Ethics, Kate Burningham and Sue Venn suggest there is a need for greater attention to the gender and relational dimensions of environmentally sustainable practice, and for promotion of holistic discourses of sustainable consumption which align sustainable living with the maintenance of family life.
Moments of Change—Opportunities for moving to more sustainable consumption? | Working Paper No 7
The idea that lifecourse transitions might offer ‘moments of change’ in which to encourage more sustainable consumption is popular, yet insights from the sociological literature on lifecourse transitions have rarely been brought to bear on this assumption. This paper focuses on two distinct lifecourse transitions - becoming a mother and retirement – and through qualitative longitudinal research evaluates the assumption that such periods provide opportunities for movement to more sustainable consumption.
Young Lives in Seven Cities—A scoping study for the CYCLES project | Working Paper No 6
How do young people see the world? What are their hopes and aspirations for the future? What does the ‘good life’ mean for them in an age of environmental and social limits? These are some of the questions that motivate the CYCLES project which we are launching with this report.
More Fun Less Stuff? Exploring Young People’s Everyday Consumption | A research log
The question of whether it is possible to live better by consuming less is a central one for CUSP. In order to answer this we need a rich understanding of the meanings that ‘stuff’ has in our lives. In this research log, Kate Burningham and colleagues offer insights into their analytical work in progress, summarising initial observations from a recent qualitative interview project with ten 18-22 year olds.
Young lives in seven cities | CYCLES project launch, 19 Sept 2017
How do young people see the world? What are their hopes and aspirations for the future? What does the ‘good life’ mean for them in an age of environmental and social limits? These are some of the questions that motivate the CYCLES project which we are delighted to launch. This event marks the launch of the project and the publication of the study’s first background city report.
What makes for a good life in Stoke-On-Trent? | A Workshop Report
This report presents a summary of a workshop we held in Stoke-on-Trent in May of this year. The emphasis in the workshop was to encourage discussions around identifying existing assets within the city, and to consider what would make Stoke-on-Trent a better place to live.
The challenge of stuff | Sue Venn presenting CUSP paper at #BSG17
Excessive focus on acquiring material goods is not only environmentally damaging but also associated with lower individual wellbeing. In this paper we focus on the transition to retirement as a period when people may reflect on the possessions they have, those they want to acquire and those they want to dispose of.
Recovering the Social | BSA Annual Conference 2017 with Kate Burningham and Sue Venn
In the light of a rising culture of hyper-individualism and denigration of the role of the social, the broad theme of the conference will consider how research might explore and challenge misrepresentations of the relationship between the personal and the public realm.
Intergenerational learning: making the SDGs work | Blog by Sue Venn
The Agenda 2030 forms an ambitious set of long-run goals. Yet, for those most affected, the year 2030 seems like a very long time in the future. How can we make the most of it and involve kids in the SDGs task, Sue Venn asks, reflecting on her participation at a recent Global Goals conference at Ken Stimpson Community School.
The Global Goals | School Conference w/ Dr Sue Venn
In this one day school conference, 160 students between the ages of 13-14 are challenged to learn, discuss and create as global citizens methods for the UK to meet the SDGs; in due course designing solutions. Dr Sue Venn is attending the conference to help the students with developing and articulating their ideas.
Doing family and sustainability | New paper by Kate Burningham and Sue Venn
Kate Burningham to present new paper at 5th International CRFR conference in Edinburgh, 14 June 2016. It argues for the development of more relational and positive discourses of sustainable consumption which align sustainable living with the creation and maintenance of family life.
Asset owners and a capital market that works | A Roundtable for Businesses
We all want long-term financial performance and the positive sustainability and social outcomes associated with this. However, too often capital markets fail to deliver these. This roundtable will focus on the top of the investment chain: what action can asset owners take?
More profit from less stuff? | A Roundtable for businesses
One of the principal themes of the shift to a sustainable economy, at least in the developed world, is ‘dematerialisation,’ – less added value from physical ‘stuff’ and more from human skills. These two meetings will address what businesses can do to make the most of this.