Philosophy 43 results

Our research into the meanings and moral framings of the good life interrogates philosophical and everyday moral assumptions about our economy and about the concept of sustainable prosperity, with a view to probing and challenging the distinction that is conventionally drawn between technical questions of economic efficiency and moral questions of justice, sustainability and equality.

Sustainable What, Why, and for Whom: Learning from Moral Philosophy | Blog by Will Davies

These are turbulent times, the fault lines within modern capitalism are widening. Yet, Will Davies finds, where one economic model becomes less certain, we can open up a much wider range of questions about what progress, prosperity and welfare actually mean: this is the right moment to interrogate the meaning and moral dimensions of prosperity.

Promethean Planetary Care – Review of Oliver Morton’s The Planet Remade | by Nick Taylor

What if geoengineering were envisaged as a utopian project of care? Oliver Morton’s The Planet Remade is a call for enlightened readership. It is an invitation to step up our thinking on the ethical questions around geoengineering.

Nature of Prosperity Dialogue: Ethics and Utopias | London, 16 February 2018

CUSP and the William Morris Society are delighted to invite you to a joint symposium on the Nature of Prosperity. The event will offer an afternoon of philosophical conversations on the themes of ethics and Utopian thinking, and how they can inform concepts of sustainable prosperity.

Finance in the Anthropocene | Blog by Nick Taylor

Risk is our society’s dominant way of governing the future in order to tame uncertainty. This is the case not only for financial crises but also for our responses to global environmental crises. The dominant risk management approach focusses on the prospect of financial devaluation and instability induced by climate change. But the kinds of calculation that are ultimately most pressing relate to how we might consider the financial system as an ecological regime itself.

The Anthropocene Reading Group 2017/18—Goldsmiths, London

Coordinated by Will Davies, Richard Douglas and Nick Taylor, the Anthropocene Reading Group is meeting regularly to discuss some of the latest literature in the field. The monthly meetings will take place on Wednesdays at 4pm.

Christmas, Consumerism and Confusion | Blog by Jonathan Rowson

Christmas is the season of shallow critique, Jonathan Rowson finds. We lament the commercialisation around us as if it were a seasonal problem, but lurking inside the wrapped presents, juicy puddings and roasted birds there are deeper questions about ethical drift and the social logic of our entire economic model.

The Good Life?—Review of Monbiot’s Out of the Wreckage | By Richard Douglas

George Monbiot has produced an encouraging manifesto for political transition to a happier, more sustainable world. Yet, Richard Douglas finds, his vision of the good life is undermined by an unresolved tension surrounding ideas of individualism.

Why we’ve never had it so good, yet everything has to change | Blog by Jonathan Rowson

We need a more conscious society, CUSP fellow Jonathan Rowson finds, and work “towards a level of depth, insight and abstraction that connects human nature and experience with societal meaning and purpose”—in the context, he writes, of a shared curiosity towards reality as a whole.

Life beyond Capital | Essay by John O’Neill

The language of capital penetrates social and environmental policy discussions at local, national and international level. Yet its appeal, John O’Neill argues, is premised on a fundamental misunderstanding of prosperity. The treatment of nature as capital is not a solution to the problems of environmental loss. Rather, it is part of the problem.

Realising the Future—Politics and methodologies of economic expectation | Workshop, 20 Dec 2017

Modernity, capitalism and finance involve distinctive orientations towards the future, in which a degree of uncertainty, risk and change are assumed. This half-day workshop explores the calculative devices, experts, discourses and images through which the future becomes available as an economic concern in the present, and considers the politics and controversies that arise in and around the future today.