Meanings & Moral Framings 32 results

Our research into the meanings and moral framings of the good life interrogates philosophical and everyday moral assumptions about our economy and about the concept of sustainable prosperity, with a view to probing and challenging the distinction that is conventionally drawn between technical questions of economic efficiency and moral questions of justice, sustainability and equality.

World Accumulation and Planetary Life | Lecture by Jason W. Moore, 10 Oct

PERC/CUSP Lecture by Jason W. Moore on "World Accumulation and Planetary Life or Why Capitalism Will Not Survive until the ‘last tree is cut’". More details to follow shortly.

Realising the Future—Politics and methodologies of economic expectation | Workshop, 20 Dec 2017

Modernity, capitalism and finance involve distinctive orientations towards the future, in which a degree of uncertainty, risk and change are assumed. This half-day workshop explores the calculative devices, experts, discourses and images through which the future becomes available as an economic concern in the present, and considers the politics and controversies that arise in and around the future today.

Commons, capabilities and collective action. A response to Ingrid Robeyns | by Emilia Melville

Robeyns’ CUSP essay opens an interesting space for reconsidering what should be of public and of private concern, Emilia Melville finds. Collective action as part of the solution can be effective if it can take place at multiple scales, and if it can nurture the love of place as well as a sense of global responsibility and sharing.

Critters, Critics, and Californian Theory – review of Haraway’s Staying with the Trouble

Solutions to climate change require good ol’ politics, Jana Bacevic argues. The attempt to avoid dealing with human(-made) Others is the key unresolved issue in an otherwise nice blend of theoretical conversation and science fiction that is Haraway’s Staying with the Trouble.

Where there is no vision, the people perish: a utopian ethic for a transformed future | Essay by Ruth Levitas

In the fifth essay in our philosophical series on the morality of sustainable prosperity, Ruth Levitas argues that thinking about our ethical responsibilities in the present and for the future is helped by looking through the lens of Utopia. The Utopian approach allows us not only to imagine what an alternative society could look like, but enables us to imagine what it might feel like to inhabit it, thus giving a greater potential depth to our judgements about the good.

Shifting the social imaginary | Blog by Jonathan Rowson

In the second part of his essay on 'Imagining a world beyond consumerism' Jonathan Rowson is challenging the extraordinary tenacity of consumerism and alighting on the idea that in order to go beyond consumerism it might be necessary to improve what German Philosopher Metzinger calls “the present cognitive and emotional abilities of our species”.

The uncanniness of climate – Review of Morton’s Hyperobjects

Timothy Morton cares about the humans and things with which he co-exists, and doesn’t want to see them destroyed. But reading Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World, Will Davies finds, it’s not entirely clear why. His version of environmental ethics is rather disquieting.

A Progressive Anthropocene? – Review of The Breakthrough Institute’s Love Your Monsters

The Breakthrough Institute asserts that ecomodernism can give us a “Good Anthropocene”. But in aiming at a second naivete of progressive modernism, it mistakenly treats nature as though it were a human creation.

Freedom and Responsibility – Sustainable Prosperity through a Capabilities Lens | Essay by Ingrid Robeyns

Is it possible to lead rich and good lives that are simultaneously just and ecologically sustainable? Yes, Ingrid Robeyns argues in the fourth of our CUSP essay series on the morality of sustainable prosperity, if we understand well-being and human flourishing in terms of human capabilities.

Imagining a world beyond consumerism | Blog by Jonathan Rowson

Consumerism is deeply problematic, but despite its obvious limitations, harms and absurdities, it is remarkably difficult to displace as our default societal setting and plot. Consumerism has become our prevailing cultural and economic modus operandi and is fundamentally more logical than it might at first appear.