Finance 20 results

The CUSP work programme is looking at sustainable finance from various angles. Through our transdisciplinary research and by combining the different perspectives, we aim to reach a richer understanding of investment and shed light on issues that have hampered the development of a green economy and more sustainable forms of prosperity.

Towards the New Normal — How to Increase Investment in the UK’s Green Infrastructure | Report

Strategic government intervention can maximise opportunities for private green infrastructure investment, our 'Investing in the Future' project report with the Aldersgate Group finds, setting out a full list of recommendations for government and industry.

Green Shoots from the Green Investment Bank, or a lost opportunity? | Blog by Fergus Lyon

The Green Investment Bank (GIB) was the UK government's flagship programme for the green economy. Investing into longterm low carbon infrastructure projects, it was set out to lead by example and attract private funds to follow suit. But what do we know about its actual impact? Fergus Lyon explores how to evaluate the influence such public sector investment has on the green economy and what else may be needed to improve the outcome.

Survey: Green investment & Decisions

As part of our System Dynamics work stream, CUSP researcher Sarah Hafner has set up an online survey for investment practitioners to help inform her work on modelling investment decision in a system dynamics framework.

Towards the New Normal | Report Launch, 12 March 2018

Increasing private investment in green infrastructure is a crucial way of meeting the UK’s strategic and environmental policy objectives cost-effectively, whilst securing more jobs, and other economic targets. This report by Aldersgate Group and CUSP provides an overview of the challenges and opportunities in the UK’s green finance market and suggests key recommendations for government, businesses and investors.

Green infrastructure: the landscape of sustainability | Guest blog by Michael Wilkins

Sustainable infrastructure is key to the low-carbon transition, Michael Wilkins argues in this guest blog — it mitigates the effects of climate change and helps protect communities from its impact. Unlocking private finance for this will be vital.

Green Finance | Alex White giving evidence to EAC, 16 January 2018

On 16 January 2018, CUSP research fellow Alex White gave evidence to the Environmental Audit Committee on their green finance inquiry. Based on our research with the Aldersgate Group, Alex White argued for the need to create an attractive low carbon investment environment in the UK if we are to see the real benefits of a growing green finance industry.

Prosperity on a finite planet | #CongresoFuturo2018 with Tim Jackson

CUSP Director Tim Jackson is joining the 7th Congreso Futuro in Chile. Set up by the Senate of Chile, with the aim to decentralize knowledge, the international 7 day event is considered to be the most important scientific dissemination event in Latin America.

Closing the Gaps Between Finance and Sustainability | FINEXUS conference w Sarah Hafner and Roberto Pasqualino

This three-day conference bridges academic research, industry and policy expertise. Practitioner sessions present success stories from leading experts and discuss how the insights from research could help to address the challenges faced by the financial industry and by policy makers.

Finance in the Anthropocene | Blog by Nick Taylor

Risk is our society’s dominant way of governing the future in order to tame uncertainty. This is the case not only for financial crises but also for our responses to global environmental crises. The dominant risk management approach focusses on the prospect of financial devaluation and instability induced by climate change. But the kinds of calculation that are ultimately most pressing relate to how we might consider the financial system as an ecological regime itself.

Could the investment system contribute to sustainable prosperity? | Blog by Charles Seaford

While some investors put pressure on some companies to act in a more sustainable or socially just way, as yet this is at the margin. In this post, Charles Seaford suggests that this pressure could move centre stage, and that changes to, and clarifications of, fiduciary duty could play a part in this.