Blog 86 results

Against environmental awakening | Review of Bonneuil and Fressoz’s The Shock of the Anthropocene

What if we have known about our unsustainable destruction of the environment for a long time? Might we learn from our history of conscious ruin, and see more lucidly which institutions, social relations and modes of thought have perpetuated it?

Taming the Climate? How politicians talk about climate change | Blog by Rebecca Willis

Climate change is not an easy subject for politicians - they have to turn scientific consensus about the need for action into a workable agenda that can win people’s support. But how do politicians go about this? In this blog, CUSP fellow Rebecca Willis summarises her research findings.

Professionals and citizens. A response to Melissa Lane | by Victor Anderson

Citizenship is not so undifferentiated as Melissa Lane's paper makes out, Victor Anderson finds, and is every bit as diverse in the particular duties it implies. Professionalism matters, yes – but being a good citizen matters even more.

‘Professional ethics’ or ‘risk management’? A response to Melissa Lane | by Will Davies

Environmental ethics cannot simply focus on the macro and the micro-levels of decision-making, Will Davies writes, when the sociology of contemporary capitalism compels us to consider the ethical commitments of institutions and authorities that operate between the two.

Journey to Earthland — The Great Transition to Planetary Civilization | Book Review by Simon Mair

Paul Raskin’s Journey to Earthland is a thought-provoking essay that delivers an imaginative, compelling critique of societal problems, culminating in an ambitious description of a global eco-utopia.

An economy that works | Blog by Tim Jackson

Prosperity isn’t just about earning more and having more, it consists in our ability to participate meaningfully in the life of society. A vital element, Tim Jackson argues, that has gone missing for ordinary people over recent decades. We must question the fundamental structures behind our economies before they will work for everyone.

Mind over matter: is scarcity as much about psychology as it is economics? | Guest blog by Dan Nixon

“Unlimited wants, scarce resources”– this is the economic problem, Dan Nixon finds. But once basic needs are met, how much should scarcity – having “enough” – be understood as a psychological problem? And what would it mean for how economics is taught?

A Dream of a Low Carbon Future | Blog by James McKay

“When an idea is sketched on a page, it can be examined and discussed much more easily than when it merely exists in people’s heads.” In this blog, CUSP Fellow James McKay introduces his recent project: A dream of a low carbon future.

“In the beginning all the world was America”: Review of Purdy’s After Nature

Jedediah Purdy’s history of the idea of nature in American thought provides an instructive context for contemporary environmental debate, Richard Douglas finds, but its idea of democracy founders on the absence of a vision of humanity’s purpose in a post-growth world.

Does slow growth lead to rising instability? | Blog by Craig Rye

In this blog, Research Fellow Craig Rye introduces a set of novel analysis techniques, drawn from ecology and physics, to better understand the changing behaviour of recessions and the business cycle (recession cycle) in historical GDP datasets.