Blog 86 results

‘Everything, in short, except that which makes life worthwhile’ | Blog by Tim Jackson

Fifty years on from Robert Kennedy’s historic speech on the limitations of the GDP at the University of Kansas in March 1968, Tim Jackson reflects on the failings of measurement and vision which still haunt both economic policy and our everyday life.

Green Shoots from the Green Investment Bank, or a lost opportunity? | Blog by Fergus Lyon

The Green Investment Bank (GIB) was the UK government's flagship programme for the green economy. Investing into longterm low carbon infrastructure projects, it was set out to lead by example and attract private funds to follow suit. But what do we know about its actual impact? Fergus Lyon explores how to evaluate the influence such public sector investment has on the green economy and what else may be needed to improve the outcome.

Dance Me to the End of Love—An Economics for Tomorrow | Guest blog by Alan Simpson

Any economics that defines the time given to human interaction as negative productivity has lost the plot, Alan Simpson writes in his guest blog. The economy of tomorrow must be built around people and their inbuilt kindness and decency.

Writing A Better Future | Guest Blog by Denise Baden

Most of us feel it: the future doesn't look too bright. Dark future visions such as the Black Mirror series feed into our anxieties; the global news and climate change discourse create further avoidance. What we need, Denise Baden argues in this guest blog, are positive visions that allow transformative solutions to be showcased and played out—a kind of product placement for sustainability. Her Writing A Better Future project is trying to do exactly that: through a series of writing competitions.

Carillion may have collapsed, but public-private partnerships can be so much more | Guest blog by Pete Barbrook-Johnson

Concerns around private companies delivering under par public services have long been aired. The collapse of Carillon, a long-standing contractor to the UK government did only worsen the picture. We should take advantage of this public ‘crisis’ in PPP, Pete Barbook-Johnson writes, not to consign them to the neoliberal history books, but to reimagine and improve them.

Sustainable What, Why, and for Whom: Learning from Moral Philosophy | Blog by Will Davies

These are turbulent times, the fault lines within modern capitalism are widening. Yet, Will Davies finds, where one economic model becomes less certain, we can open up a much wider range of questions about what progress, prosperity and welfare actually mean: this is the right moment to interrogate the meaning and moral dimensions of prosperity.

There’s no political pressure to act on climate. So how are MPs responding? | Blog by Rebecca Willis

The electorate are not asking their representatives to act on climate change, research by CUSP fellow Rebecca Willis indicates. This presents a fundamental dilemma for politicians who understand the urgency. How can they square this circle?

Green infrastructure: the landscape of sustainability | Guest blog by Michael Wilkins

Sustainable infrastructure is key to the low-carbon transition, Michael Wilkins argues in this guest blog — it mitigates the effects of climate change and helps protect communities from its impact. Unlocking private finance for this will be vital.

Promethean Planetary Care – Review of Oliver Morton’s The Planet Remade | by Nick Taylor

What if geoengineering were envisaged as a utopian project of care? Oliver Morton’s The Planet Remade is a call for enlightened readership. It is an invitation to step up our thinking on the ethical questions around geoengineering.

Finance in the Anthropocene | Blog by Nick Taylor

Risk is our society’s dominant way of governing the future in order to tame uncertainty. This is the case not only for financial crises but also for our responses to global environmental crises. The dominant risk management approach focusses on the prospect of financial devaluation and instability induced by climate change. But the kinds of calculation that are ultimately most pressing relate to how we might consider the financial system as an ecological regime itself.