Linda Geßner

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Linda is a communications consultant in sustainability and responsible for the web development and editorial management of the CUSP website and social media platforms. She is leading on event communications, and in her capacity as graphic designer directing the visual language of the Centre.

Posts by Linda Geßner 103 results

World Accumulation and Planetary Life | Lecture by Jason W. Moore, 10 Oct

PERC/CUSP Lecture by Jason W. Moore on "World Accumulation and Planetary Life or Why Capitalism Will Not Survive until the ‘last tree is cut’". More details to follow shortly.

Young Lives in Seven Cities—A scoping study for the CYCLES project | Working Paper No 6

How do young people see the world? What are their hopes and aspirations for the future? What does the ‘good life’ mean for them in an age of environmental and social limits? These are some of the questions that motivate the CYCLES project which we are launching with this report.

Navigating social and commercial objectives in social enterprise | CUSP at ESRC Festival of Social Science

Social enterprises have to find ways of having a big social impact on people and the planet while also running a good business. How is this done, and how do you get over the tension between commercial and social objectives? In this ESRC Festival of Social Science workshop, we draw on our research to give those attending the tools to understand the tensions they face, and how they can find a way to navigate through this.

Realising the Future—Politics and methodologies of economic expectation | Workshop, 20 Dec 2017

Modernity, capitalism and finance involve distinctive orientations towards the future, in which a degree of uncertainty, risk and change are assumed. This half-day workshop explores the calculative devices, experts, discourses and images through which the future becomes available as an economic concern in the present, and considers the politics and controversies that arise in and around the future today.

Call for Papers — Cultural Trends Special Issue: After the Creative Economy

CUSP researchers Kate Oakley and Jonathan Ward are guest editors of an upcoming edition of Cultural Trends. In exploring how the idea of the creative economy persists since the 1980s, papers are invited that engage with the topic on a social, political, economic and/or organisational level.

From Economic Growth to Growth in Wellbeing | Resurgence Festival w Tim Jackson, 23 Sept 2017

The Resurgence & Ecologist magazine, Britain’s flagship green magazine, is hosting its fifth Festival of Wellbeing on 23 Sept 2017. The event will raise money for The Resurgence Trust and features CUSP Director Tim Jackson in conversation with Satish Kumar.

Young lives in seven cities | CYCLES project launch, 19 Sept 2017

How do young people see the world? What are their hopes and aspirations for the future? What does the ‘good life’ mean for them in an age of environmental and social limits? These are some of the questions that motivate the CYCLES project which we are delighted to launch. This event marks the launch of the project and the publication of the study’s first background city report.

Financial institutions and the fiduciary duty | A roundtable for businesses

The need for the investment industry to help produce a sustainable economy and a cohesive society is well understood and much discussed. There have been some successes, but as yet these are exceptions that prove the rule: our environmental and social problems remain as acute as ever. Is a more radical approach needed?

At the interface | Prof Fergus Lyon presenting CUSP research at #AOM2017

A growing number of businesses is interested in contributing to positive social and environmental change, yet face challenges in how they can assess their impacts meaningfully. This issue will be explored at the 77th Meeting of the Academy of Management in Atlanta, USA, with Fergus Lyon sharing CUSP research.

Commons, capabilities and collective action. A response to Ingrid Robeyns | by Emilia Melville

Robeyns’ CUSP essay opens an interesting space for reconsidering what should be of public and of private concern, Emilia Melville finds. Collective action as part of the solution can be effective if it can take place at multiple scales, and if it can nurture the love of place as well as a sense of global responsibility and sharing.