Linda Geßner

Linda is a communication designer with an interdisciplinary background in social psychology and political science, business administration and economics. In CUSP she is responsible for public relations, the web development and editorial management of the website and social media platforms. She is leading on event communications, and directing the visual language of the Centre.

Posts by Linda Geßner 144 posts
Chasing Progress | CUSP Newsletter April 2018
Fifty years after Bobby Kennedy’s speech highlighting the limitations of the GDP as a measure of progress, it’s appropriate in this issue to highlight our new working paper outlining a different way of measuring economic welfare – based on ideas from the theory of change literature. A second recent working paper confronts the thorny question of inequality in the face of declining growth rates and explores the potential for (and limits of) redistributive policy options such as the basic income...
Vacancy: CUSP Administrative Assistant (part-time)
We are looking for an empathetic, professional and highly-organised individual to support the coordination of the ESRC-funded Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity (CUSP), part-time. Closing date for application:15 May 2018
Confronting inequality in a post-growth world – Basic income, factor substitution and the future of work | Working Paper No 11
Piketty argued that slow growth rates inevitably lead to rising inequality. If true, this hypothesis would pose serious challenges for a ‘post-growth’ society. Fiscal responses to this dilemma include Piketty’s own suggestion to tax capital assets and more recent suggestions to provide a universal basic income that would allow even the poorest in society to meet basic needs.
The People’s Projects | Feral Spaces Project shortlisted for Public Voting
The arts and learning project ‘Feral Spaces’ by CUSP Fellow Laurel Gallagher is shortlisted for public voting. The voting is open from 16-30 April. If successful, the Feral Spaces group will provide art activities for young people, using disused local spaces and recycled materials, to promote appreciation of the local environment.
Can the financial system work for the economy, people & the planet? | Lecture by Nick Silver
The current financial system developed to serve capitalism 1.0, a world of mass employment based on producing physical goods. This world is ceasing to exist – this talk will discuss the trends that are causing the change, and how finance needs to change to serve the economy of the future.
System Error | New documentary w Tim Jackson investigating the paradigm of ‘economic growth’
Why are we so obsessed with economic growth, knowing that it has devastating effects on our finite planet (and ultimately us)? SYSTEM ERROR looks for answers to this principal contradiction of our time and considers global capitalism from the perspective of those who run it.
A Theory of Change Approach for Measuring Economic Welfare Beyond GDP | Working Paper No 10
It is widely acknowledged that GDP is not a suitable measure of economic welfare. In this paper, Simon Mair, Christine Corlet Walker and Angela Druckman propose a novel framework for indicator development: the ‘Theory of Change’ approach — a causal model approach in which the relationships between system inputs, activities, outputs and outcomes of the economy are explicitly articulated, and can be used to identify theoretically sound indicators for economic welfare.
The Politics of Enclaves: Launch of Economic Science Fictions | London, 2 May 2018
Economic Science Fictions is a new volume of essays exploring the overlap between the economic imagination and science fiction, in economics, fiction, design fiction and utopian (and dystopian) political economy. To celebrate the publication of the book, this event will explore the politics of enclaves from the perspective of urban design and science fiction, so as to cast different light on the anxieties and hopes of the present.
The role of government policy in financing early stage green innovation | Journal Paper by R Owen, G Brennan and F Lyon
This paper focuses on the role of the public sector in addressing finance gaps for longer-term investment requirements from seed investment through to early growth commercialisation of green innovation activities. Peer reviewed literature is identified from international studies, complemented by illustrative policy documents where evidence of impact is reported.
Economic Science Fictions | Edited by Will Davies
From the libertarian economics of Ayn Rand to Aldous Huxley’s consumerist dystopias, economics and science fiction have often orbited each other. In Economic Science Fictions, CUSP co-investigator Will Davies has deliberately merged the two worlds, asking how we might harness the power of the utopian imagination to revitalise economic thinking.
CUSP Newsletter | March 2018
This edition links to the videos from our Nature of Prosperity event on 16 Feb. You'll find our new green finance report, the culmination of our year long study with the Aldersgate Group, which sets out 30 clear policy recommendations to increase the rate of green finance in the UK. In July, we will be holding a workshop on Economics for the Anthropocene and are inviting papers. We’re also looking for people to take part in our study of work in the cultural sector.
Towards the New Normal — How to Increase Investment in the UK’s Green Infrastructure | Report
Strategic government intervention can maximise opportunities for private green infrastructure investment, our 'Investing in the Future' project report with the Aldersgate Group finds, setting out a full list of recommendations for government and industry.
Complexity in the global agricultural system | Roberto Pasqualino presenting his latest CUSP/GSI work at Agri World 2018
The complexity of the global agricultural system is a tremendous barrier to the understanding of the impact that policies and business decisions may have on society at both global and national levels. CUSP research fellow Roberto Pasqualino will be presenting the latest work on his world system computer model, testing both climate and policy shocks to assess their possible outcomes and risks in the medium to long term future.
Survey: Green investment & Decisions
As part of our System Dynamics work stream, CUSP researcher Sarah Hafner has set up an online survey for investment practitioners to help inform her work on modelling investment decision in a system dynamics framework.
Economic Theory for the Anthropocene—Towards Heterodox Understandings of Sustainable Economies
CUSP and the Institute of Advanced Studies at the University of Surrey are pleased to announce a call for contributions to a free, one and a half day workshop for researchers to share and discuss their early stage work in heterodox economics. We are inviting contributions that explore heterodox theories of the economy and how they could help us transition to sustainable societies.
Towards the New Normal | Report Launch, 12 March 2018
Increasing private investment in green infrastructure is a crucial way of meeting the UK’s strategic and environmental policy objectives cost-effectively, whilst securing more jobs, and other economic targets. This report by Aldersgate Group and CUSP provides an overview of the challenges and opportunities in the UK’s green finance market and suggests key recommendations for government, businesses and investors.
Green infrastructure: the landscape of sustainability | Guest blog by Michael Wilkins
Sustainable infrastructure is key to the low-carbon transition, Michael Wilkins argues in this guest blog — it mitigates the effects of climate change and helps protect communities from its impact. Unlocking private finance for this will be vital.
Measuring up – how the UK is performing on the SDGs | CUSP leading research on Goal 17
CUSP working with UKSSD cross-sector network, developing first comprehensive assessment of the UK’s performance against the UN Sustainable Development Goals
Everyday Culture and the Good Life | Working Paper No 9
The purpose of this paper is to prepare the ground for a strand of work in CUSP which aims to look at the role of culture in everyday life, and in doing so to understand how it might operate as an element of sustainable prosperity. The paper considers the basis on which we might start to think about new legitimations for cultural policy and a fuller understanding of its potential for living well with less.
Nature of Prosperity Dialogue: Ethics and Utopias | London, 16 February 2018
CUSP and the William Morris Society are delighted to invite you to a joint symposium on the Nature of Prosperity. The event will offer an afternoon of philosophical conversations on the themes of ethics and Utopian thinking, and how they can inform concepts of sustainable prosperity.
Nature On The Page — Wildlines @ The Leeds Library w Kate Oakley, 15 Mar 2018
On 15 March 2018, CUSP researcher Kate Oakley will be joining an expert panel of writers and naturalists to explore the process of putting our experience of the natural world down on paper. Who gets to write about nature, and why? Is there a place for politics in nature writing? Does the north have the nature-writing it deserves? And why does nature writing matter?
Craft micro-enterprises: Sustainable ‘good work’ or the precarious gig economy? | Seminar w Alice Owen, 28 Feb 2018
This seminar uses case studies of different forms of craft-microenterprises to suggest how and, perhaps, why micro-enterprises create more or less sustainable outcomes in terms of economic activity, community development, health and wellbeing and environmental impacts.
The art of the good life: culture and sustainable prosperity | Journal paper by Kate Oakley and Jon Ward
This paper analyses the potential for cultural work to encourage alternative visions of the “good life”, in particular, how it might encourage a kind of “sustainable prosperity” wherein human flourishing is not linked to high levels of material consumption but rather the capabilities to engage with cultural and creative practices and communities.
Green Finance | Alex White giving evidence to EAC, 16 January 2018
On 16 January 2018, CUSP research fellow Alex White gave evidence to the Environmental Audit Committee on their green finance inquiry. Based on our research with the Aldersgate Group, Alex White argued for the need to create an attractive low carbon investment environment in the UK if we are to see the real benefits of a growing green finance industry.
Prosperity on a finite planet | #CongresoFuturo2018 with Tim Jackson
CUSP Director Tim Jackson is joining the 7th Congreso Futuro in Chile. Set up by the Senate of Chile, with the aim to decentralize knowledge, the international 7 day event is considered to be the most important scientific dissemination event in Latin America.
Closing the Gaps Between Finance and Sustainability | FINEXUS conference w Sarah Hafner and Roberto Pasqualino
This three-day conference bridges academic research, industry and policy expertise. Practitioner sessions present success stories from leading experts and discuss how the insights from research could help to address the challenges faced by the financial industry and by policy makers.
Doughnut Economics | Lecture by Kate Raworth, 7 Feb 2018
Humanity’s 21st century challenge is to meet the need of all within the means of the planet. Kate Raworth argues that last-century’s economic theories will in no way equip us for it. Instead, it’s time for some serious rethinking.
Cleaning up the economy: Business models of environmental social enterprises | Seminar w Ellen Stenslie, 24 Jan 2018
Environmentally motivated social enterprises (ESEs) sit at the heart of business model innovation for sustainability. Yet, empirical research within this field is lacking. Ellen Stenslie will present her latest research.
Prosperity Is…? | A Research Log by S Venn, K Burningham, K Skippon and T Jackson
What can prosperity possibly mean in a world of environmental and social limits? This question lies at the heart of CUSP’s five year research programme on sustainable prosperity. We wanted to know how ordinary people in different contexts might answer this question, so we set out to ask them. What we found was fascinating.
The Anthropocene Reading Group 2017/18—Goldsmiths, London
Coordinated by Will Davies, Richard Douglas and Nick Taylor, the Anthropocene Reading Group is meeting regularly to discuss some of the latest literature in the field. The monthly meetings will take place on Wednesdays at 4pm.
The Acting Class | Film screening and discussion, Leeds 6 Dec 2017
The Acting Class (77 mins) is a documentary feature film by Mike Wayne and Deirdre O’Neill that explores the causes and consequences of class stratification in the acting profession. The screening will be followed by a discussion with the film makers.
The Social Effects of Global Trade | New book w chapter by Simon Mair, Angela Druckman and Tim Jackson
As part of a new compilation of groundbreaking work on social indicators, Simon Mair, Angela Druckman and Tim Jackson have contributed a chapter examining how globalisation since 1990 has shaped fairness in the Western European clothing supply chain.
Sustainable Prosperity and Democracy—A Research Agenda | Working Paper No 8
As environmental crises become ever more severe, calls for authoritarian solutions are reappearing: Democracy, so the argument goes, has proven to be too slow to respond to urgent threats. In this paper, Marit Hammond and Graham Smith respond to this charge by revisiting the role of democracy within a transition to sustainable prosperity.
Climate Innovation Insights: Accelerating the transition to sustainable production systems | Edited by Geraldine Brennan
Edited by Geraldine Brennan, the second series of Climate Innovation Insights shares understanding of how to nurture and sustain cross-sector collaboration to scale up the circular economy and Accelerate the transition to sustainable production systems.
Engaging the imagination | Journal paper by Kate Oakley, Jon Ward and Ian Christie
This paper explores the potential of 'new nature writing' – a literary genre currently popular in the UK – as a kind of arts activism, in particular, how it might engage with the environmental crisis and lead to a kind of collective politics.
Sustainable Consumption in Early Motherhood | Journal Paper by Kate Burningham and Sue Venn
In their new paper for the Journal of Consumer Ethics, Kate Burningham and Sue Venn suggest there is a need for greater attention to the gender and relational dimensions of environmentally sustainable practice, and for promotion of holistic discourses of sustainable consumption which align sustainable living with the maintenance of family life.
BBC World Service | Tim Jackson in discussion w Annie Quick, Daniel Ben-Ami and Jared Bernstein
We are told again and again that GDP growth is good for the economy; it is said to lift people out of poverty, provides jobs and investment, and improves lives. While there is general agreement about the need for growth in the developing world, what about the costs of growth in the rich world?
Moments of Change—Opportunities for moving to more sustainable consumption? | Working Paper No 7
The idea that lifecourse transitions might offer ‘moments of change’ in which to encourage more sustainable consumption is popular, yet insights from the sociological literature on lifecourse transitions have rarely been brought to bear on this assumption. This paper focuses on two distinct lifecourse transitions - becoming a mother and retirement – and through qualitative longitudinal research evaluates the assumption that such periods provide opportunities for movement to more sustainable consumption.
World development within Planetary Boundaries | Lecture with Johan Rockström
The advent of the Anthropocene, the scientific recognition of the remarkably stable state of the Earth system during the Holocene Inter-glacial, the rising evidence of global risks of crossing Earth tipping points and the signs of a gradual decline in Earth resilience, constitute overwhelming evidence for the need of a deep mind-shift. In his lecture, Johan Rockström presents his science of sustainability.
Life beyond Capital | Essay by John O’Neill
The language of capital penetrates social and environmental policy discussions at local, national and international level. Yet its appeal, John O’Neill argues, is premised on a fundamental misunderstanding of prosperity. The treatment of nature as capital is not a solution to the problems of environmental loss. Rather, it is part of the problem.