month : 12/2018 8 posts
Creative Economy: Critical Perspectives | Workshop, Glasgow—1 Mar 2019
Though the creative economy remains a powerful idea in policy circles, concerns about inequality, worker exploitation and the promotion of over-consumption have begun to grow. This one-day workshop looks at some of these concerns, but also at the potential for arts and culture to help us think through these issues and re-frame a more sustainable and human creative economy.
How the light gets in | CUSP Newsletter December 2018
We’re delighted to announce that the video coverage from our recent Nature of Prosperity debate is now online. Around the same time we held the second in our series of policy briefings for parliamentarians on the theme of building An Economy that Works, focusing this time on confronting inequality in an era of low growth. A fascinating development over recent weeks has been an increasingly robust online debate between proponents of green growth and those with a more sceptical ‘post-growth’ position. Interesting to see how this debate is bridging some traditional left-right divides.
Video | Nature of Prosperity Dialogue w Kerry Kennedy, Clive Lewis, Miatta Fahnbulleh, Michael Jacobs and Rowan Williams
We’re delighted to be joined in Westminster by Kerry Kennedy, US human rights lawyer and daughter of RFK, Clive Lewis MP, Shadow Treasury Minister, Miatta Fahnbulleh, Chief Executive of the New Economics Foundation, Michael Jacobs, Director of the IPPR Commission on Economic Justice, and Rowan Williams, former Archbishop of Canterbury.
Escaping the iron cage of consumerism | Blog by Tim Jackson
Our systematic failure to address existential anxiety robs society of meaning and blinds us to the suffering of others; to persistent poverty; to the extinction of species; to the health of global ecosystems. With this think piece, Tim Jackson adds to an eclectic set of essays, published in honour of Wolfgang Sachs.
COP24: climate protesters must get radical and challenge economic growth | Blog by Christine Corlet Walker
With so much attention focused on what agreements come out of COP24, protesters should be seizing the initiative to attack the root causes of climate change, CUSP PhD researcher Christine Corlet-Walker finds. (This blog first appeared on The Conversation, 30 Nov 2018).
The moral vision of environmental sceptics | Blog by Richard Douglas
Richard Douglas introduces his new CUSP working paper, in which he uses ‘Listening Rhetoric’ to attend to the moral vision which environmental sceptics are keen to defend. The key to understanding their rejection of environmentalism—and doing more to counter the appeal of their arguments—lies in recognising their preoccupation with defending a moral vision of modernity, he argues.
The Commonplaces of Environmental Scepticism | Working Paper No 16
It is nearly half a century since the Club of Rome’s Limits to Growth report was published. The thesis at its core—that infinite growth is impossible on a finite planet—is a seemingly common sensical proposition. To investigate why the ‘limits to growth’ has not yet led to decisive political action, this paper examines the thought of its most explicit critics in debate, employing Wayne Booth's ‘Listening Rhetoric’, used to understand opposing discourses on their own terms.
The subprime financial crisis—10 years after: Was Hyman Minsky a post-Keynesian economist? | Lecture by Marc Lavoie, London 11 Dec 2018
As the subprime financial crisis erupted in 2008, Wall Street analysts started talking of the Minsky Moment. Widely ignored by mainstream economists until then, Minsky's financial instability hypothesis became enormously popular. In his CUSP lecture, Marc Lavoie will outline the main features of this work and discusses whether Minsky was part of the a post-Keynesian school of thought, or not.