month : 10/2018 15 posts
A government is not a household | Blog by Frank van Lerven and Andrew Jackson
Claims of ending austerity ring hollow, Frank van Lerven and Andrew Jackson write, until we do away the ‘household fallacy’, and realise that public spending can be deployed as a potent weapon against many of the challenges we face today. (This blog first appeared on the NEF website).
Beyond Redistribution—Confronting inequality in an era of low growth | An Economy That Works, Briefing Paper No 2
The second in our series of briefing papers on building An Economy That Works explores inequality in the UK. It examines the evidence for rising inequality over the last fifty years, estimates the economic welfare lost to society from an unequal distribution of incomes and addresses the critical question of managing inequality in the context of declining growth rates.
Which financial architecture can protect environmental commons? | Article by Nick Molho and Tim Jackson
The discourse around ‘natural capital’ potentially offers a way to integrate decisions about the commons effectively into economic decisions. Investing in the commons is key to protecting the flow of services provided to society by natural capital. Recent exploration of the potential for investing in natural infrastructure has highlighted numerous mechanisms, which could help turn this proposition into a reality.
Why some cities are ‘rebel cities’—interview with Yaz Brien about Bristol’s resistance scene | by Joost de Moor
Grassroots activism is widely considered a vital element in society’s shift to becoming more just and ecologically balanced. What is it about certain places/cities that makes them more conducive to the emergence and sustainability of environmental activism?
One Hundred Islands — An Interactive Installation | York Theatre Royal, 6 Nov 2018
One Hundred Islands is an installation that has been created through a collaboration between The Bare Project Theatre Company and the CUSP. The installation responds to the concept of denial: in particular the denial of the immediate need for change. Why are we failing to act? Is it that we won’t listen or that we are unable to?
The Future Starts Today | CUSP Newsletter October 2018
Change is in the air. Just a week after the IPCC’s game-changing report on meeting the 1.5o target was published, the UK government brought out its latest Global Strategic Trends (GST) review. Compiled under the unlikely tutelage of the Ministry of Defence, the review is a sobering read, recognising, with little uncertainty, that climate breakdown, environmental destruction and increasing inequality are key security threats. Perhaps more surprisingly, GST 2018 openly discusses the growth dilemma, drawing on a background paper commissioned from us last year.
The Post-growth Challenge: Secular Stagnation, Inequality and the Limits to Growth | Journal Paper by Tim Jackson
Sluggish recovery in the wake of the financial crisis has revived discussion of a ‘secular stagnation’. These conditions have been blamed for rising inequality and political instability. Tim Jackson contests this view, pointing instead to a steadfast refusal to address the ‘post-growth challenge’. (An earlier draft of the article was published as CUSP Working Paper No 12.)
Generation Z — A photography exhibition by CUSP Fellow Kerstin Hacker, documenting the changing urban experience in Zambia
Documentary photographer and CUSP fellow Kerstin Hacker is investigating the developing consumer culture of Lusaka (Zambia) and examines photographically the emergence of a new cultural sector. Supported by the Centre of African Studies at University of Cambridge, the exhibition is on show until 21 December 2018.
Global Strategic Trends | MOD taking note of the Post-Growth Challenge
On 15 October, the UK Ministry of Defence’s think tank, the Development Concepts and Doctrine Centre, published it’s sixth Global Strategic Trends report. 'The Future Starts Today' draws on a range of analysis across academia, business, government departments and nations from across the globe, including commissioned research by CUSP Director Tim Jackson.
This Must be the Place: An interview with Dan Lyttleton | By Mark Ball
Coming at an interesting time for the city, Dan Lyttleton’s new photo book This Must be the Place prompts discussions of Stoke ‘free from cliches’. Given CUSP’s continued interest in the city, Mark Ball sat down with Dan to talk about his new book, the role of photography, and Stoke.
The Dilemma of Growth | Panel debate w CUSP Director Tim Jackson and Deutsche Bank Chief Economist David Folkerts-Landau
As part of the 2018 ZEIT Wirtschaftsforum, CUSP Director Tim Jackson and Deutsche Bank Chief Economist David Folkerts-Landau were invited for a debate on the dilemma of growth, the relevance of GDP growth for wellbeing, and the political feasibility of a postgrowth agenda.
No hard feelings: Why environmental scholars can’t afford to dismiss children’s views of the good life | Blog by Anastasia Loukianov
“What can children tell you about the good life? Oh popsicles are great, raisins suck.’’ — conversations like this can make for a good laugh, but exemplify an almost systemic scepticism towards children’s legitimacy in social debate, CUSP researcher Anastasia Loukianov finds. There are compelling reasons, she argues, for working alongside young people in defining what it might mean to live well in a world of planetary limits.
The value of disused urban spaces for young people | Blog by Laurel Gallagher
Since 2016, CUSP Fellow Laurel Gallagher has been developing youth-led placemaking projects in semi-wild disused urban spaces. Workshops invite young people to explore disused spaces, re-imagining them for their own purposes while experts bring the tools and skills needed to transform young people’s ideas into reality. In this blog, Laurel summarises a few of the project findings.
Heat, Greed and Human Need | Seminar with Ian Gough, Guildford 1 Nov 2018
Prof Ian Gough is Visiting Professor at the Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion and an Associate at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. Ian’s latest book, and the focus for this CUSP/CES seminar, is Heat, Greed and Human Need. It offers a powerful analysis of the connections between climate change, economic growth and social policy.
The Future We Want: Shaping Environmental Politics | Networking Event, London 26 Oct 2018
CUSP researchers at the PSA Specialist Group Environmental Politics organising a networking event for policymakers, academics and environmental NGOs to discuss environmental policy-making in a shifting political landscape.