month : 07/2018 13 posts
Work: a situation vacant | Blog by Richard Douglas
We need a new defining idea for political economy, writes Richard Douglas. Could we find it in the idea of economic activity as service? (This article originally appeared in Issue 6 of The Mint.)
Growth for the sake of growth | Guest blog by Federico Demaria
“Growth for the sake of growth” remains the credo of governments and international institutions, Federico Demaria finds. The time is ripe, he argues, not only for a scientific degrowth research agenda, but also for a political one. (This article is a transcript of Federico’s address to the European Commission, in preparation of the 2018 Post-Growth conference at the EU Parliament, 18-19 Sept 2018.)
Politics for the ‘New Normal’ | CUSP newsletter July 2018
This July edition of our CUSP newsletter features the first in our new series of policy briefings on An Economy That Works, an upcoming journal article from Marit Hammond, making a renewed case for ecological democracy and Victor Anderson's working paper on protecting the interests of future generations. We have just unearthed the unpublished transcript from our 2016 public meeting of the APPG with Caroline Lucas, Jørgen Randers, Graeme Maxton, Kate Raworth and Federico Demaria discussing the End of Growth. It still makes for fascinating reading.
Protecting the Interests of Future Generations | Working Paper No 14
Even the most perfect democracy can only represent the wishes of people currently alive. But how can the interests of members of future generations be safeguarded in political systems? This paper outlines different ways in which this could be achieved through reforms to the UK political system, and then looks in more detail at examples in other countries.
A Cultural Account of Ecological Democracy | Journal Paper by Marit Hammond
What are the political foundations of an ecologically sustainable society? Can—or must—they be democratic? Absolutely 'yes' Marit Hammond argues, for sustainability is a moving target that requires a reflexive cultural ethos based on democratic values.
Beyond 5%: why autonomy matters for workers’ wellbeing | Blog by Simon Mair
A recent trial of 4 day week in New Zealand inspired a 5% increase in life satisfaction. As celebrated as the results are, such measures are unlikely to contribute sufficiently towards more sustainable economies, Simon Mair argues, reflecting on the limits of such reforms within our current system. He wonders what it might take to get beyond 5% to something more utopian.
How hard is it to score the seventeenth goal? | Blog by Victor Anderson
Partnerships are central to the achievement of all 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) but partners need to be proactive and willing. Summarising our recent contribution to the first comprehensive assessment of the UK’s performance against the SDGs, Victor Anderson explains why the UK’s progress has so far been limited as a result.
Monetising nature: a metaphor too far? | Blog by Aled Jones
Natural Capital Valuation is a fiercely debated approach to account for nature in business and management decision processes. A new report by Aled Jones and colleagues finds that without extra checks in place to accompany the valuation frameworks, there is a real risk that biodiversity loss actually worsens as monetisation tools are embedded — and that they are not being used as intended.
Understanding the ‘New Normal’—The Challenge of Secular Stagnation | An Economy That Works, Briefing Paper No 1
This first in our series of briefing papers on building An Economy That Works explores the underlying phenomenon of ‘secular stagnation’ – a long-term decline in the rate of growth of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The paper examines the evidence, explores the causes and discusses the implications of what some now call the ‘new normal’.
Exploring the natural capital debate—Creating a space for conversation about conservation across boundaries? | Blog by Fergus Lyon
The search for innovative ways of tackling sustainability and conservation challenges while supporting local communities and livelihoods has brought together a group of researchers from Colombia, Mexico, Peru and the UK. Summarising the workshop, Fergus Lyon is reflecting on how the concept of natural capital can be used (and abused).
Everything is extraordinary: Prosperity and the qualities of attention | Guest blog by Dan Nixon
The way we pay attention affects our wellbeing and our relationships. But it also connects to our freedoms, our political decisions and our deeper sense of purpose. This post considers: what is the link between our attention and our prosperity?
Rebound Mitigation — Environmental policy making in the context of rebound effects | Seminar w David F Vivanco, 19 July 2018
In this talk, David will introduce preliminary results of the Effective environmental policies in Europe in the context of rebound effects (EFFECT) project, which aims at developing an innovative analytical framework for capturing rebound effects.
Measuring Up – how the UK is performing on the SDGs | Report
UKSSD publishing first comprehensive assessment of the UK’s performance against the SDGs. With support from CUSP on SDG 17, highlighting a significant danger of the UK quality of life getting worse if action is not taken.