month : 02/2017 11 posts
National Infrastructure Assessment | Evidence Submission
In October 2016, the National Infrastructure Commission has launched a 15 week call for evidence to provide input into the development of its National Infrastructure Assessment. The Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity responded.
Commentary on The Struggle for Meaningful Work | by Simon Mair
For most of us—wherever we are in the world—work is a central component of our lives. Any Great Transition narrative wanting to connect with people has to address issues of work. How do we reorient the economy so that its values reflect our values rather than profit?
Who is clearing up the ‘mess’ at ‘home’? A feminist response to Roger Scruton | by Malaika Cunningham
Scruton’s understanding of home or ‘oikophilia’ overlooks the patriarchal norms which govern these institutions, Malaika Cunningham argues in her response, this undermines his own argument against doctrines and ‘top-down’ structures.
A Cultural Account of Ecological Democracy | Marit Hammond presenting paper at major international workshop
CUSP co-investigator Marit Hammond to present her paper The Centrality of Culture in Ecological Democracy at a major international Democracy workshop, 20 February 2017. The workshop will contribute to the work of the Task Force on the Conceptual Foundations of Earth System Governance, coordinated by the Earth System Governance Project.
Culture and climate change | Seminar with Joe Smith and Renata Tyszczuk, 15 Mar 2017
Climate change is urgent and important, but also, for many, boring, difficult and confusing. What kinds of stories, artworks and other interventions are being created in response to ‘the greatest challenge facing humanity’ — a challenge that is also apparently forgettable?
What exactly are we conserving? A response to Roger Scruton | by Will Davies
Conservative thinking offers various necessary ingredients for any serious reflection on the meaning of ‘sustainable prosperity’. Yet, the relationship between sustainable prosperity and conservatism is a paradoxical one, Will Davies argues in his reply to Roger Scruton's recent essay for CUSP.
Connecting Societies and Cultures | Discoveries on your Doorstep evening with Kate Burningham
CUSP Deputy Director Kate Burningham will give a presentation at the second event in Surrey's Discoveries on your Doorstep series, with the theme this time on Connecting Societies and Cultures. Kate will draw on ongoing research which we are conducting in Stoke-on Trent.
Theatre, Performance and Employment | Keynote by Prof Kate Oakley
Co-Investigator Prof Kate Oakley to give a keynote presentation for the Theatre, Performance & Employment symposium to take place 23 – 24 February 2017 at Queen Mary University of London, bringing together scholars, artists, and activists from the theatre and performance industries.
Settling Down and Marking Time | Essay by Roger Scruton
Can we create communities that are both prosperous and sustainable? And can we do this while retaining democratic procedures? These are huge questions and, like others who have addressed them, Roger Scruton is by no means convinced that he has a persuasive answer. But an answer is more likely to be found, he argues, "in the legacy of conservative thinking, than by adopting the standpoint of the top-down plan."
Rethinking Capitalism | Joint lecture by Mariana Mazzucato and Michael Jacobs, 15 March 2017
In this joint lecture, Mariana Mazzucato and Michael Jacobs will seek to explain the causes of the current economic crisis, and suggest how we might escape it. Drawing on their new book, Rethinking Capitalism: Economics and Policy for Sustainable and Inclusive Growth they will show how today’s deep economic problems reflect the inadequacies of orthodox economic theory and the failure of economic policies informed by it.
Making all things comrades – Review of Wark’s Molecular Red
The great humanistic emancipatory projects of the 20th century have run into the sand, leaving a non-humanistic one running riot: the Carbon Liberation Front. The rapid liberation of carbon molecules into the earth’s atmosphere is the dominant political programme of the 21st century, and neither state socialism nor capitalism provide any adequate response, it seems.