month : 12/2016 6 posts
Prosperity without Growth | Book Launch, 19 Dec 2016
What can prosperity possibly mean in a world of environmental and social limits? With this substantially revised and re-written edition, Tim Jackson expands upon the arguments of the 1st edition and demonstrates that building a ‘post-growth’ economy is a precise, definable and meaningful task.
An economy that works | Blog by Tim Jackson
Prosperity isn’t just about earning more and having more, it consists in our ability to participate meaningfully in the life of society. A vital element, Tim Jackson argues, that has gone missing for ordinary people over recent decades. We must question the fundamental structures behind our economies before they will work for everyone.
Mind over matter: is scarcity as much about psychology as it is economics? | Guest blog by Dan Nixon
“Unlimited wants, scarce resources”– this is the economic problem, Dan Nixon finds. But once basic needs are met, how much should scarcity – having “enough” – be understood as a psychological problem? And what would it mean for how economics is taught?
A Dream of a Low Carbon Future | Blog by James McKay
“When an idea is sketched on a page, it can be examined and discussed much more easily than when it merely exists in people’s heads.” In this blog, CUSP Fellow James McKay introduces his recent project: A dream of a low carbon future.
“In the beginning all the world was America”: Review of Purdy’s After Nature
Jedediah Purdy’s history of the idea of nature in American thought provides an instructive context for contemporary environmental debate, Richard Douglas finds, but its idea of democracy founders on the absence of a vision of humanity’s purpose in a post-growth world.
Does slow growth lead to rising instability? | Blog by Craig Rye
In this blog, Research Fellow Craig Rye introduces a set of novel analysis techniques, drawn from ecology and physics, to better understand the changing behaviour of recessions and the business cycle (recession cycle) in historical GDP datasets.