NEWS

With a team of over 50 people, CUSP is a busy research centre, engaged in a variety of projects. We produce working papers, journal articles, blogs and public events, we respond to government enquiries, commission essays, and contribute to the publication of books. CUSP is also involved in numerous research cooperations with other institutions. On this page you’ll find updates from the various engagements of the centre. Subscribe to our monthly newsletter to receive a regular digest in your inbox.


261 Results

Beyond 5%: why autonomy matters for workers’ wellbeing | Blog by Simon Mair

A recent trial of 4 day week in New Zealand inspired a 5% increase in life satisfaction. As celebrated as the results are, such measures are unlikely to contribute towards more sustainable economies, Simon Mair argues, reflecting on the limits of such reforms within our current system. He wonders what it might take to get beyond 5% to something more utopian.


How hard is it to score the seventeenth goal? | Blog by Victor Anderson

Partnerships are central to the achievement of all 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) but partners need to be proactive and willing. Summarising our recent contribution to the first comprehensive assessment of the UK’s performance against the SDGs, Victor Anderson explains why the UK’s progress has so far been limited as a result.


Monetising nature: a metaphor too far? | Blog by Aled Jones

Natural Capital Valuation is a fiercely debated approach to account for nature in business and management decision processes. A new report by Aled Jones and colleagues finds that without extra checks in place to accompany the valuation frameworks, there is a real risk that biodiversity loss actually worsens as monetisation tools are embedded — and that they are not being used as intended.


Understanding the ‘New Normal’—The Challenge of Secular Stagnation | An Economy That Works, Briefing Paper No 1

This first in our series of briefing papers on building An Economy That Works explores the underlying phenomenon of ‘secular stagnation’ – a long-term decline in the rate of growth of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The paper examines the evidence, explores the causes and discusses the implications of what some now call the ‘new normal’.


Exploring the natural capital debate—Creating a space for conversation about conservation across boundaries? | Blog by Fergus Lyon

The search for innovative ways of tackling sustainability and conservation challenges while supporting local communities and livelihoods has brought together a group of researchers from Colombia, Mexico, Peru and the UK. Summarising the workshop, Fergus Lyon is reflecting on how the concept of natural capital can be used (and abused).


Everything is extraordinary: Prosperity and the qualities of attention | Guest blog by Dan Nixon

The way we pay attention affects our wellbeing and our relationships. But it also connects to our freedoms, our political decisions and our deeper sense of purpose. This post considers: what is the link between our attention and our prosperity?


Rebound Mitigation — Environmental policy making in the context of rebound effects | Seminar w David F Vivanco, 19 July 2018

In this talk, David will introduce preliminary results of the Effective environmental policies in Europe in the context of rebound effects (EFFECT) project, which aims at developing an innovative analytical framework for capturing rebound effects.


Measuring Up – how the UK is performing on the SDGs | Report

UKSSD publishing first comprehensive assessment of the UK’s performance against the SDGs. With support from CUSP on SDG 17, highlighting a significant danger of the UK quality of life getting worse if action is not taken.


Making Tomorrow Work | CUSP Newsletter June 2018

‘The past is not always a reliable guide to future performance’ – so they say. But sometimes it can hide surprising lessons.


The Return of Character: Parallels Between Late-Victorian and Twenty-First Century Discourses | Journal Paper by Nick Taylor

There has been an increasingly common trend in the UK to identify character skills and traits as the basis for various individual successes and achievements. In education policy and employment services, character has been linked to the making of successful, morally aware, employable and socially mobile citizens. This article explores the late-19th-century use of character discourses, focusing on the economist Alfred Marshall.


Katniss Everdeen, Utopia, and The Future of Work | Blog by Simon Mair

What is the future of work in a world of social and environmental limits? Drawing lessons from utopian fiction, and introducing the latest CUSP working paper, Simon Mair wonders if we can avoid ending up in the Hunger Games.


The Future of Work—Lessons from the History of Utopian Thought | Working Paper No 13

This paper aims to contribute towards the development of a political economy of work fit for purpose in a world of social and environmental limits. In order to get beyond today’s dominant conceptions of work in a growth-based capitalism, Simon Mair, Angela Druckman and Tim Jackson explore the role of work in historical utopias.


Enjoyable, meaningful lives without economic growth or jobs? | Guest blog by Alison Kidd

How will people live enjoyably and meaningfully in a world of less economic growth? Do the care, craft, culture and creative activities which CUSP is exploring offer a promising alternative prosperity? Behavioural psychologist Alison Kidd recently studied the activities of 325 UK people to find out what they found enjoyable and meaningful to see if she could get clues.


Social Darts | Blog by Mark Ball

Leisure doesn’t always make business sense, and success doesn’t mean turning a profit. Against the logic of expansion and abundance, Stoke has something major metropolitan cities do not, Mark Ball finds. His research looks at the connections between leisure, wellbeing and sense of place — and currently involves playing a lot of darts


From stranded workers to enabled workers—Lessons for a successful low carbon economy | Blog by Lucy Stone

From stranded to enabled workers — the transition to renewable, low carbon economies is a huge opportunity to create more stable, healthy sources of employment, a new Agulhas report finds, but it needs smart management. CUSP Fellow Lucy Stone is highlighting some of the key findings.


Climate Justice as economic mobilization | Seminar w Stefan Jacobsen, London 21 June 2018

Drawing on a newly published book, this talk will give a brief outline of the economic ideas that have been central in the buildup of a global movement for Climate Justice (CJ) since the 1990s. Jacobsen argues that although campaigns against the dominance of carbon markets and for divestment strengthened the CJ movement in raw numbers, these approaches also marked a move away from earlier demands for radical equality as part of transitioning away from fossil fuels.


Economic Theory for the Anthropocene | Workshop w Ioana Negru and Gaël Giraud, 3 July 2018

In the 10 years since the financial crisis, heterodox theories of the economy have flourished. On 3 July 2018, as part of a workshop, CUSP and the Institute of Advanced Studies at the University of Surrey are pleased to invite you to two talks by leading economists in the field.


Against all odds? Modelling the low-carbon transition | Blog by Martin Sers

Can renewable energy supply grow rapidly enough to both, cover societies growing energy needs and displace fossil fuel use sufficiently to keep carbon emissions below some “safe” level? — the leading question of a recent CUSP paper in Ecological Economics. In this blog, Martin Sers is summarising the findings.


Can a play start a conversation and generate multi-disciplinary projects? | Guest blog by Shirley Wardell

Few people understand how money works, and yet it has a vital part in our lives. In her new theatre play ‘Balance’, former Positive Money consultant Shirley Wardell tries to address this issue by making the topic relevant to people who watch the play — and to those who act in it.


Making Connections | CUSP Newsletter May 2018

Our theme this month is making connections: taking our lead from Sue Venn’s blog on the relationship between the craft (the art of making) and sustainable prosperity. This month also features a blog from Will Davies summarising our collective work across CUSP on the role of utopian thinking. And two papers make economic connections. Martin Sers and Peter Victor’s paper on the energy emissions trap and my new CUSP working paper on the ‘post-growth challenge’.


CIRCONOMÌA | Circular Economy Festival w Tim Jackson and Kerry Kennedy, Milan/Pollenzo 24-25 May 2018

On 24 and 25 May 2018, Tim Jackson will be joining Kerry Kennedy, human rights lawyer and daughter of Robert Kennedy, for a series of dialogues on prosperity, inequality and human rights at the 3rd Circonomìa festival in Italy. Under the theme of  “growth without prosperity, prosperity without growth”, Tim and Kerry will be discussing the legacy of Robert Kennedy’s historic speech at the University of Kansans on the failings of measurement and vision that, after 50 years, still haunt both economic policy and our everyday life.


Making connections, experiencing flow, and countering consumption: crafting is more fun with less stuff | Blog by Sue Venn

One of the research projects within CUSP is concerned with how wellbeing can be enhanced through immersing oneself in challenging activities, leading to a state of ‘flow’. BBC Four’s recent MAKE! Craft Britain programme is a perfect showcase of that concept. The programme is connecting people to traditional crafts, past and present generations — and, importantly, to those with whom we are crafting.


Defining and promoting carbon literacy | Seminar w Rachel Howell, 28 June 2018

Given government policies and public discourse aiming to change everyday behaviour so as to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, individuals are increasingly encouraged to understand how their activities contribute to such emissions, and how they can reduce their personal carbon footprint. This seminar proposes a definition of ‘carbon literacy’ and compares this with other, related concepts.


‘Secular stagnation’ meets the ‘GDP fetish’ | Blog by Tim Jackson

Tim Jackson introduces his new CUSP working paper ‘The Post-Growth Challenge’, in which he discusses the state of advanced economies ten years after the crisis. Our attempts to prop up an ailing capitalism have increased inequality, hindered ecological innovation and undermined stability, he argues.


The Post-Growth Challenge — Secular Stagnation, Inequality and the Limits to Growth | Working Paper No 12

Sluggish recovery in the wake of the financial crisis has revived discussion of a ‘secular stagnation’. These conditions have been blamed for rising inequality and political instability. Tim Jackson contests this view, pointing instead to a steadfast refusal to address the ‘post-growth challenge’.


The Energy-Emissions Trap | Journal Paper by Martin Sers and Peter Victor

The requirement to reduce emissions to avoid potentially dangerous climate change implies a dilemma for societies heavily dependent on fossil fuels. As renewable capacity requires energy to construct there is an initial fossil fuel cost to creating new renewable capacity. An insufficiently rapid transition to renewables, it turns out, will imply a scenario in which it is impossible to avoid either transgressing emissions ceilings or facing energy shortages.


T h i s is not all there is: Thinking utopias as ideas and practices | Blog by Will Davies

‘Utopias’ is one of the cross-cutting themes in CUSP, spanning our various research programmes. In this blog, Will Davies is reflecting on what the concept of utopia can offer in terms of its prefigurative potential, and how it is informing our interdisciplinary research.


The Anthropocene Reading Group 2017/18—Goldsmiths, London

Coordinated by Will Davies, Richard Douglas and Nick Taylor, the Anthropocene Reading Group is meeting regularly to discuss some of the latest literature in the field. The monthly meetings will take place on Wednesdays at 4pm.


Thinking About Global Prosperity Measures | Seminar with Matthew Davies, 24 May 2018

In recent years the search for post-GDP metrics has spawned a proliferation of composite indexes that aim to measure national prosperity, progress, happiness etc. In this seminar Matthew Davies will briefly introduce these indexes and how they are constructed, and then examine a range of complex issues that surround them.


Confronting inequality: basic income and the right to work | Blog by Tim Jackson

Ten years after the financial crisis, inequality in advanced economies is still rising. Tim Jackson presents the findings of a new CUSP working paper to explore potential solutions.


Chasing Progress | CUSP Newsletter April 2018

Fifty years after Bobby Kennedy’s speech highlighting the limitations of the GDP as a measure of progress, it’s appropriate in this issue to highlight our new working paper outlining a different way of measuring economic welfare – based on ideas from the theory of change literature. A second recent working paper confronts the thorny question of inequality in the face of declining growth rates and explores the potential for (and limits of) redistributive policy options such as the basic income…


Confronting inequality in a post-growth world – Basic income, factor substitution and the future of work | Working Paper No 11

Piketty argued that slow growth rates inevitably lead to rising inequality. If true, this hypothesis would pose serious challenges for a ‘post-growth’ society. Fiscal responses to this dilemma include Piketty’s own suggestion to tax capital assets and more recent suggestions to provide a universal basic income that would allow even the poorest in society to meet basic needs.


Forging connections: Review of The Progress of this Storm and General Ecology | By Richard Douglas

How should we understand the relationship between nature and society, now that we have entered that condition known as the Anthropocene? Two new books offer radically opposing views on this question—though, as Richard Douglas finds, both remain prisoners of post-Kantian metaphysics.


The People’s Projects | Feral Spaces Project shortlisted for Public Voting

The arts and learning project ‘Feral Spaces’ by CUSP Fellow Laurel Gallagher is shortlisted for public voting. The voting is open from 16-30 April. If successful, the Feral Spaces group will provide art activities for young people, using disused local spaces and recycled materials, to promote appreciation of the local environment.


Filling the finance gap for early stage green innovations | Blog by Fergus Lyon

The green economy of the future will be shaped by the innovative enterprises emerging today. But picking the winners of tomorrow is notoriously difficult. Small entrepreneurial businesses wanting to contribute to the transition to a low carbon and sustainable economy may have the desire to scale up, but without the trading track record or the assets for collateral, they may be turned down by banks and other investors.


Can the financial system work for the economy, people & the planet? | Lecture by Nick Silver

The current financial system developed to serve capitalism 1.0, a world of mass employment based on producing physical goods. This world is ceasing to exist – this talk will discuss the trends that are causing the change, and how finance needs to change to serve the economy of the future.


System Error | New documentary w Tim Jackson investigating the paradigm of ‘economic growth’

Why are we so obsessed with economic growth, knowing that it has devastating effects on our finite planet (and ultimately us)? SYSTEM ERROR looks for answers to this principal contradiction of our time and considers global capitalism from the perspective of those who run it.


A Theory of Change Approach for Measuring Economic Welfare Beyond GDP | Working Paper No 10

It is widely acknowledged that GDP is not a suitable measure of economic welfare. In this paper, Simon Mair, Christine Corlet Walker and Angela Druckman propose a novel framework for indicator development: the ‘Theory of Change’ approach — a causal model approach in which the relationships between system inputs, activities, outputs and outcomes of the economy are explicitly articulated, and can be used to identify theoretically sound indicators for economic welfare.


The Politics of Enclaves: Launch of Economic Science Fictions | London, 2 May 2018

Economic Science Fictions is a new volume of essays exploring the overlap between the economic imagination and science fiction, in economics, fiction, design fiction and utopian (and dystopian) political economy. To celebrate the publication of the book, this event will explore the politics of enclaves from the perspective of urban design and science fiction, so as to cast different light on the anxieties and hopes of the present.


The role of government policy in financing early stage green innovation | Journal Paper by R Owen, G Brennan and F Lyon

This paper focuses on the role of the public sector in addressing finance gaps for longer-term investment requirements from seed investment through to early growth commercialisation of green innovation activities. Peer reviewed literature is identified from international studies, complemented by illustrative policy documents where evidence of impact is reported.


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