System Dynamics 28 results

Achieving a sustainable prosperity requires both compelling narratives of change and robust economic models to deliver them. This theme collates and synthesises different narratives of sustainable prosperity from across CUSP and from elsewhere. Using systems dynamic approaches we explore the macroeconomics of resource-limited, ecologically constrained economies and test the robustness and resilience of alternative avenues of change.

Closing the Gaps Between Finance and Sustainability | FINEXUS conference w Sarah Hafner and Roberto Pasqualino

This three-day conference bridges academic research, industry and policy expertise. Practitioner sessions present success stories from leading experts and discuss how the insights from research could help to address the challenges faced by the financial industry and by policy makers.

The Anthropocene Reading Group 2017/18—Goldsmiths, London

Coordinated by Will Davies, Richard Douglas and Nick Taylor, the Anthropocene Reading Group is meeting regularly to discuss some of the latest literature in the field. The monthly meetings will take place on Wednesdays at 4pm.

The Social Effects of Global Trade | New book w chapter by Simon Mair, Angela Druckman and Tim Jackson

As part of a new compilation of groundbreaking work on social indicators, Simon Mair, Angela Druckman and Tim Jackson have contributed a chapter examining how globalisation since 1990 has shaped fairness in the Western European clothing supply chain.

In Defence of Degrowth — A Comment by Simon Mair

The concept of 'degrowth' is politically infeasible, according to a recent article by Branko Milanović. In this blog, Simon Mair argues that ‘degrowth’ is no less unrealistic than the alternatives.

World development within Planetary Boundaries | Lecture with Johan Rockström

The advent of the Anthropocene, the scientific recognition of the remarkably stable state of the Earth system during the Holocene Inter-glacial, the rising evidence of global risks of crossing Earth tipping points and the signs of a gradual decline in Earth resilience, constitute overwhelming evidence for the need of a deep mind-shift. In his lecture, Johan Rockström presents his science of sustainability.

A fair days wage for a fair days work? | Blog by Simon Mair

The people who make our clothes are paid very low wages. We instinctively feel that this is unfair, but it can be hard to articulate why this is. Even harder, is saying what can be done about it. Summarising his recent journal article with Tim Jackson and Angela Druckman, Simon Mair uses the living wage as a basis for claims about fairness, and discuss regional collective bargaining as a solution to unfair wages.

The future of jobs: is decent work for all a pipe dream? | Blog by Tim Jackson

Rapid developments in technology and unpredictable economies are destabilising employment as we know it. What are the possible solutions? It’s not the demand for human labour that is disappearing, Tim Jackson argues, but the institutions and economics to deliver it.

Chasing good work – reflections on The Taylor Review | By Simon Mair and Agni Dikaiou

One of the achievements of the recent Taylor review has been to breathe new life into the UK debate on good work. Going forward, this debate has to consider work in its wider social context, Simon Mair and Agni Dikaiou find; we have to think about Good Work not just as end in itself, but as a part of other systemic challenges. 

Ecological Economics in action | CUSP paper presentations at ESEE 2017 Conference Budapest

CUSP researches Agni Dikaiou, Sarah Hafner, Simon Mair and Craig Rye to give paper presentations at the 2017 Annual Conference of the European Society for Ecological Economics, introducing their CUSP projects to the international ESEE community.

Prosperity without Growth – Foundations for the Economy of Tomorrow | by Tim Jackson

The publication of Prosperity without Growth was a landmark in the sustainability debate. This substantially revised and re-written edition updates its arguments and considerably expands upon them. Tim Jackson demonstrates that building a ‘post-growth’ economy is not Utopia - it's a precise, definable and meaningful task. It’s about taking simple steps towards an economics fit for purpose.