Societal Understandings 15 results

At the heart of any form of prosperity lie the desires, aspirations, needs and capabilities of ordinary people. Understanding these needs and aspirations is vital for sustainable prosperity. Our research on the social and psychological understandings of the good life explores the contested and situated nature of people’s visions of the good life and explores the role of materialism in delivering (and hindering) a sense of prosperity.

The Politics of Sustainable Prosperity | Research Workshop – Keele, 11 July 2017

In times of climate change, overconsumption, and ecological collapse, we must re-think the meaning of prosperity: What is needed are new visions of environmentally sustainable, yet still flourishing societies. This research symposium considers the political foundations of such societies, bringing together papers on both the barriers and new possibilities of sustainability politics in the current conjecture.

Imagining a world beyond consumerism | Blog by Jonathan Rowson

Consumerism is deeply problematic, but despite its obvious limitations, harms and absurdities, it is remarkably difficult to displace as our default societal setting and plot. Consumerism has become our prevailing cultural and economic modus operandi and is fundamentally more logical than it might at first appear.

Thriving beyond Surviving | Seminar with Maja Göpel and Katherine Trebeck, 15 May 2017

Sustainable development is the 21st Century’s wicked problem. The design of our economies and the principles of our economics have taken us to an extreme, unsustainable and unjust point. It’s widely recognised that system change is badly needed. But what does such large scale transformation actually mean? And how do we put it into practice?

The political nature of sustainable prosperity | Panel session w Joan Walley and Fanny Broholm

Video now available +++ How can we build a political consensus for sustainability that is inclusive and fair? How do research and practice move beyond the divisive nature of ‘post-truth’ populism? As part of the 2017 Nexus conference, CUSP was hosting a breakout session with Kate Burningham, Fanny Broholm, Phil Catney, Will Davies and Joan Walley.

Recovering the Social | BSA Annual Conference 2017 with Kate Burningham and Sue Venn

In the light of a rising culture of hyper-individualism and denigration of the role of the social, the broad theme of the conference will consider how research might explore and challenge misrepresentations of the relationship between the personal and the public realm.

Political Populism and Sustainability | Guest blog by Mike Hulme

This blog is a transcript of Mike's contribution to the conference Sustainability in Turbulent Times on 16 March 2016, reflecting on the implications of recent swings towards populism and nationalism around the world, for the relationship between inequality, democracy and sustainability.

Who is clearing up the ‘mess’ at ‘home’? A feminist response to Roger Scruton | by Malaika Cunningham

Scruton’s understanding of home or ‘oikophilia’ overlooks the patriarchal norms which govern these institutions, Malaika Cunningham argues in her response, this undermines his own argument against doctrines and ‘top-down’ structures.

Connecting Societies and Cultures | Discoveries on your Doorstep evening with Kate Burningham

CUSP Deputy Director Kate Burningham will give a presentation at the second event in Surrey's Discoveries on your Doorstep series, with the theme this time on Connecting Societies and Cultures. Kate will draw on ongoing research which we are conducting in Stoke-on Trent.

Survey: Values and Everyday Experiences

Take part in our study to understand how people's values may impact upon their everyday experiences and feelings. The results will help inform research and interventions looking at how a change in values may allow for more positive experiences and improved well-being.

Intergenerational learning: making the SDGs work | Blog by Sue Venn

The Agenda 2030 forms an ambitious set of long-run goals. Yet, for those most affected, the year 2030 seems like a very long time in the future. How can we make the most of it and involve kids in the SDGs task, Sue Venn asks, reflecting on her participation at a recent Global Goals conference at Ken Stimpson Community School.