Meanings & Moral Framings 22 results

Our research theme on the meanings and moral framings of the good life interrogates philosophical and everyday moral assumptions about our economy and about the concept of sustainable prosperity, with a view to probing and challenging the distinction that is conventionally drawn between technical questions of economic efficiency and moral questions of justice, sustainability and equality.

Rethinking Capitalism | Joint lecture by Mariana Mazzucato and Michael Jacobs, 15 March 2017

In this joint lecture, Mariana Mazzucato and Michael Jacobs will seek to explain the causes of the current economic crisis, and suggest how we might escape it. Drawing on their new book, Rethinking Capitalism: Economics and Policy for Sustainable and Inclusive Growth they will show how today’s deep economic problems reflect the inadequacies of orthodox economic theory and the failure of economic policies informed by it.

Making all things comrades – Review of Wark’s Molecular Red

The great humanistic emancipatory projects of the 20th century have run into the sand, leaving a non-humanistic one running riot: the Carbon Liberation Front. The rapid liberation of carbon molecules into the earth’s atmosphere is the dominant political programme of the 21st century, and neither state socialism nor capitalism provide any adequate response, it seems.

Professional Ethics in the Mirror. A response to Melissa Lane | by Aled Jones and Alison Greig

Academics must be conscious of the impact they create, Aled Jones and Alison Greig argue in their commentary, "even if that impact is unintentional. We must take responsibility for the action, or lack thereof, from the knowledge that we disseminate."

Against environmental awakening | Review of Bonneuil and Fressoz’s The Shock of the Anthropocene

What if we have known about our unsustainable destruction of the environment for a long time? Might we learn from our history of conscious ruin, and see more lucidly which institutions, social relations and modes of thought have perpetuated it?

Professionals and citizens. A response to Melissa Lane | by Victor Anderson

Citizenship is not so undifferentiated as Melissa Lane's paper makes out, Victor Anderson finds, and is every bit as diverse in the particular duties it implies. Professionalism matters, yes – but being a good citizen matters even more.

‘Professional ethics’ or ‘risk management’? A response to Melissa Lane | by Will Davies

Environmental ethics cannot simply focus on the macro and the micro-levels of decision-making, Will Davies writes, when the sociology of contemporary capitalism compels us to consider the ethical commitments of institutions and authorities that operate between the two.

A New Professional Ethics for Sustainable Prosperity | Essay by Melissa Lane

Whose job is it to save the planet? Apart from a very few people the task is not in anyone’s job description. Yet, to achieve sustainable prosperity, we can’t afford to hide behind the permissions attached to our professional roles as they now stand, argues Melissa Lane in the first essay of our new CUSP essay series on the ethics of sustainable prosperity.

The Anthropocene Reading Group 2016-17 | PERC, London

Coordinated by Will Davies, Richard Douglas and Nick Taylor, the Anthropocene Reading Group is meeting regularly to discuss some of the latest literature in the field. The monthly meetings will take place on Wednesdays at 4pm.

Social Science and Moral Economy | Evening lecture by Prof Andrew Sayer, 22nd Feb 2017

Using the example of political economy, Professor Andrew Sayer will talk about social science’s conflicted stances towards normativity, and how these derive from unsatisfactory treatments of culture-nature relations, and a false equation of objectivity with value-freedom.

“In the beginning all the world was America”: Review of Purdy’s After Nature

Jedediah Purdy’s history of the idea of nature in American thought provides an instructive context for contemporary environmental debate, Richard Douglas finds, but its idea of democracy founders on the absence of a vision of humanity’s purpose in a post-growth world.