Arts & Culture 26 results

Our research into the role of the arts & culture in delivering prosperity explores the ways in which arts and cultural activities can help develop ideas of the good life beyond material consumption.

Everyday Culture and the Good Life | Working Paper No 9

The purpose of this paper is to prepare the ground for a strand of work in CUSP which aims to look at the role of culture in everyday life, and in doing so to understand how it might operate as an element of sustainable prosperity. The paper considers the basis on which we might start to think about new legitimations for cultural policy and a fuller understanding of its potential for living well with less.

Nature On The Page — Wildlines @ The Leeds Library w Kate Oakley, 15 Mar 2018

On 15 March 2018, CUSP researcher Kate Oakley will be joining an expert panel of writers and naturalists to explore the process of putting our experience of the natural world down on paper. Who gets to write about nature, and why? Is there a place for politics in nature writing? Does the north have the nature-writing it deserves? And why does nature writing matter?

The art of the good life: culture and sustainable prosperity | Journal paper by Kate Oakley and Jon Ward

This paper analyses the potential for cultural work to encourage alternative visions of the “good life”, in particular, how it might encourage a kind of “sustainable prosperity” wherein human flourishing is not linked to high levels of material consumption but rather the capabilities to engage with cultural and creative practices and communities.

Not the City of Culture — Blog by Mark Ball

Early December 2017 Stoke-on-Trent was one of four cities not to win the title of UK City of Culture 2021. This may have been drowned out by the ongoing noise of European Capital of Culture uncertainty, but it was big news for Coventry who now follow Hull and Derry~Londonderry to hold the award. In this blog, Mark Ball is reflecting on not winning City of Culture.

The Acting Class | Film screening and discussion, Leeds 6 Dec 2017

The Acting Class (77 mins) is a documentary feature film by Mike Wayne and Deirdre O’Neill that explores the causes and consequences of class stratification in the acting profession. The screening will be followed by a discussion with the film makers.

Meritocracy vs. Social Cohesion: A Review of The Acting Class (UK, 2017)—By Anthony Killick

The latest documentary from D O’Neill and M Wayne highlights the barriers faced by working class actors attempting to pursue cultural work. The film exposes the fraudulence behind some of the central tenets of neoliberal meritocracy, Anthony Killick finds, particularly the idea that arts and cultural jobs are equally accessible to all on a “level playing field”.

Engaging the imagination | Journal paper by Kate Oakley, Jon Ward and Ian Christie

This paper explores the potential of 'new nature writing' – a literary genre currently popular in the UK – as a kind of arts activism, in particular, how it might engage with the environmental crisis and lead to a kind of collective politics.

Call for Papers — Cultural Trends Special Issue: After the Creative Economy

CUSP researchers Kate Oakley and Jonathan Ward are guest editors of an upcoming edition of Cultural Trends. In exploring how the idea of the creative economy persists since the 1980s, papers are invited that engage with the topic on a social, political, economic and/or organisational level.

Stoke, the City of Culture? | Blog by Jonathan Ward

Stoke-On-Trent has set itself an ambitious task with its bid for UK City of Culture 2021. Should it be awarded the promising title then it will face a number of competing priorities and tensions, Jonathan Ward comments on the recent shortlisting, and the city should take it seriously.

After Urban Creative Economies | RGS-IBG Annual Conference w Kate Oakley and Jon Ward

The creative economy continues to inform activity outside de-industrialised urban centres. In this session at the 2017 RGS-IBG annual conference we will explore how the creative economy persists.