Themes 105 results

The Politics of Sustainable Prosperity | Research Workshop – Keele, 11 July 2017

In times of climate change, overconsumption, and ecological collapse, we must re-think the meaning of prosperity: What is needed are new visions of environmentally sustainable, yet still flourishing societies. This research symposium considers the political foundations of such societies, bringing together papers on both the barriers and new possibilities of sustainability politics in the current conjecture.

A competitive economy needs an ambitious low carbon policy | Blog by Nick Molho

The new government will need to have an ambitious and stable low carbon policy at the heart of its project to support the UK’s competitiveness and deliver export opportunities for its businesses, argues Nick Molho, CUSP co-investigator and executive director of the Aldersgate Group.

A Progressive Anthropocene? – Review of The Breakthrough Institute’s Love Your Monsters

The Breakthrough Institute asserts that ecomodernism can give us a “Good Anthropocene”. But in aiming at a second naivete of progressive modernism, it mistakenly treats nature as though it were a human creation.

Freedom and Responsibility – Sustainable Prosperity through a Capabilities Lens | Essay by Ingrid Robeyns

Is it possible to lead rich and good lives that are simultaneously just and ecologically sustainable? Yes, Ingrid Robeyns argues in the fourth of our CUSP essay series on the morality of sustainable prosperity, if we understand well-being and human flourishing in terms of human capabilities.

How to kick the growth addiction | Tim Jackson in conversation with Allen White

Endless economic growth, long the rallying cry of the conventional paradigm, endangers our future. Ecological economist Tim Jackson, CUSP Director and author of Prosperity Without Growth, explores the need to envision a post-growth economy with Allen White, Senior Fellow at the Tellus Institute.

The welfare state’s role in the transition to sustainable prosperity | Guest Blog by Dan Bailey

In his guest blog, Dan Bailey discusses the role and necessity of the welfare state in ensuring the democratic legitimacy of the transition to ‘sustainable prosperity’. He writes here about the welfare state in the context of prolonged austerity and the political revolts of the Trump vote and Brexit referendum, and in dialogue with different streams of work within CUSP.

Seeking a sustainable finance plan for the UK | Blog by Alex White

As part of its involvement in CUSP, the Aldersgate Group is launching a one-year project to understand how to increase private investment in green infrastructure. In her blog, project lead Alex White explains how we will be looking at the most material barriers and considering the solutions to incentivise greater investment in the projects that will underpin the UK’s upcoming policy packages.

Imagining a world beyond consumerism | Blog by Jonathan Rowson

Consumerism is deeply problematic, but despite its obvious limitations, harms and absurdities, it is remarkably difficult to displace as our default societal setting and plot. Consumerism has become our prevailing cultural and economic modus operandi and is fundamentally more logical than it might at first appear.

Prosperity without Growth – Foundations for the Economy of Tomorrow | by Tim Jackson

The publication of Prosperity without Growth was a landmark in the sustainability debate. This substantially revised and re-written edition updates its arguments and considerably expands upon them. Tim Jackson demonstrates that building a ‘post-growth’ economy is not Utopia - it's a precise, definable and meaningful task. It’s about taking simple steps towards an economics fit for purpose.

Thriving beyond Surviving | Seminar with Maja Göpel and Katherine Trebeck, 15 May 2017

Sustainable development is the 21st Century’s wicked problem. The design of our economies and the principles of our economics have taken us to an extreme, unsustainable and unjust point. It’s widely recognised that system change is badly needed. But what does such large scale transformation actually mean? And how do we put it into practice?