News 75 results

Broken promises—the engine of consumerism | Blog by Tim Jackson

Does consumerism thrive on our discontentment? Tim Jackson argues yes, the success of consumer society lies not in meeting our needs but in its spectacular ability to repeatedly disappoint us. This may seem dark, but from here we can understand why consumerism must eventually fall – and how to replace it.

Nature of Prosperity: Ethics and Utopias | London, 16 February 2018

CUSP and the William Morris Society are delighted to invite you to a joint symposium on the Nature of Prosperity. The event will offer an afternoon of philosophical conversations on the themes of ethics and Utopian thinking, and how they can inform concepts of sustainable prosperity. It marks the launch of the new edition of William Morris's influential utopian work, News from Nowhere, as well as CUSP’s collection of essays on The Morality of Sustainable Prosperity.

World Accumulation and Planetary Life | Lecture by Jason W. Moore, 10 Oct

PERC/CUSP Lecture by Jason W. Moore on "World Accumulation and Planetary Life or Why Capitalism Will Not Survive until the ‘last tree is cut’". More details to follow shortly.

Navigating social and commercial objectives in social enterprise | CUSP at ESRC Festival of Social Science

Social enterprises have to find ways of having a big social impact on people and the planet while also running a good business. How is this done, and how do you get over the tension between commercial and social objectives? In this ESRC Festival of Social Science workshop, we draw on our research to give those attending the tools to understand the tensions they face, and how they can find a way to navigate through this.

Sustainable Prosperity Ideas | CUSP Summer School 2017

The challenges of sustainable prosperity require the insights of a wide range of thinkers and CUSP is supporting those new to research to explore some of the most challenging questions related to sustainability and wellbeing. The first CUSP summer school brought together 24 PhD students at Cumberland Lodge, an educational charity near Windsor, over three days to share ideas, build friendships and have conversations that cut across the academic disciplines and experiences of all attending.

Call for Papers — Cultural Trends Special Issue: After the Creative Economy

CUSP researchers Kate Oakley and Jonathan Ward are guest editors of an upcoming edition of Cultural Trends. In exploring how the idea of the creative economy persists since the 1980s, papers are invited that engage with the topic on a social, political, economic and/or organisational level.

From Economic Growth to Growth in Wellbeing | Resurgence Festival w Tim Jackson, 23 Sept 2017

The Resurgence & Ecologist magazine, Britain’s flagship green magazine, is hosting its fifth Festival of Wellbeing on 23 Sept 2017. The event will raise money for The Resurgence Trust and features CUSP Director Tim Jackson in conversation with Satish Kumar.

The future of jobs: is decent work for all a pipe dream? | Blog by Tim Jackson

Rapid developments in technology and unpredictable economies are destabilising employment as we know it. What are the possible solutions? It’s not the demand for human labour that is disappearing, Tim Jackson argues, but the institutions and economics to deliver it.

Young lives in seven cities | CYCLES project launch, 19 Sept 2017

How do young people see the world? What are their hopes and aspirations for the future? What does the ‘good life’ mean for them in an age of environmental and social limits? These are some of the questions that motivate the CYCLES project which we are delighted to launch. This event marks the launch of the project and the publication of the study’s first background city report.

Chasing good work – reflections on The Taylor Review | By Simon Mair and Agni Dikaiou

One of the achievements of the recent Taylor review has been to breathe new life into the UK debate on good work. Going forward, this debate has to consider work in its wider social context, Simon Mair and Agni Dikaiou find; we have to think about Good Work not just as end in itself, but as a part of other systemic challenges.