Commentary 9 results

Commons, capabilities and collective action. A response to Ingrid Robeyns | by Emilia Melville

Robeyns’ CUSP essay opens an interesting space for reconsidering what should be of public and of private concern, Emilia Melville finds. Collective action as part of the solution can be effective if it can take place at multiple scales, and if it can nurture the love of place as well as a sense of global responsibility and sharing.

Artists as workers. A response to John Bellamy Foster | by Kate Oakley

Bellamy Foster’s essay is to be warmly welcomed for putting the question of what constitutes ‘good work’ on the table. But by arguing - at least in parts - that good work looks like creative or artistic work, it risks perpetuating certain ideas about artistic production that will harm, rather than aid, the struggle for good work, Kate Oakley finds.

Reducing work to transform work. A response to John Bellamy Foster | by Nick Taylor

John Bellamy Foster is right that we mustn’t abandon the project of pursuing non-alienating work, nor simply see work as a disutility. Yet, there is clearly space for articulating the importance of reduced, reproductive and redistributed work, Nick Taylor finds, and systems of social security that support these circumstances, as part of efforts to deliver democratic control over meaningful work.

The Meanings of ‘Home’. A response to Roger Scruton | by Victor Anderson

Roger Scruton’s paper usefully enlarges the scope of our discussions in CUSP, bringing a wider range of concepts to bear on the question of “sustainable prosperity”. However despite this wide scope, Victor Anderson argues, there is inherent in his arguments a philosophical justification for nimbyism.

Who is clearing up the ‘mess’ at ‘home’? A feminist response to Roger Scruton | by Malaika Cunningham

Scruton’s understanding of home or ‘oikophilia’ overlooks the patriarchal norms which govern these institutions, Malaika Cunningham argues in her response, this undermines his own argument against doctrines and ‘top-down’ structures.

What exactly are we conserving? A response to Roger Scruton | by Will Davies

Conservative thinking offers various necessary ingredients for any serious reflection on the meaning of ‘sustainable prosperity’. Yet, the relationship between sustainable prosperity and conservatism is a paradoxical one, Will Davies argues in his reply to Roger Scruton's recent essay for CUSP.

Professional Ethics in the Mirror. A response to Melissa Lane | by Aled Jones and Alison Greig

Academics must be conscious of the impact they create, Aled Jones and Alison Greig argue in their commentary, "even if that impact is unintentional. We must take responsibility for the action, or lack thereof, from the knowledge that we disseminate."

Professionals and citizens. A response to Melissa Lane | by Victor Anderson

Citizenship is not so undifferentiated as Melissa Lane's paper makes out, Victor Anderson finds, and is every bit as diverse in the particular duties it implies. Professionalism matters, yes – but being a good citizen matters even more.

‘Professional ethics’ or ‘risk management’? A response to Melissa Lane | by Will Davies

Environmental ethics cannot simply focus on the macro and the micro-levels of decision-making, Will Davies writes, when the sociology of contemporary capitalism compels us to consider the ethical commitments of institutions and authorities that operate between the two.